Graceworks Lutheran Services has been serving the Miami Valley for 90 years, but that doesn’t mean it takes an old-fashioned approach to senior care. In fact, Graceworks recently demolished a building at Bethany Village to construct a modern assisted-living facility unlike anything else in the area.

“In a way it was a difficult decision to demolish a building that was full because it really didn’t meet we felt like the standard of what seniors and the people who need assisted living would want in the future. So it was really a pre-planning strategy on our part,” says Jackie D’Aurora, vice president of marketing and communications for Graceworks Lutheran Services.

Called Crescent Crossing, the new 74-bed assisted-living facility adds 50 more beds than the previous building, but also doubles the square footage of each room to 600.

“What is so different when you have 600 square feet to work with and not 300 is to have a separate bedroom from your living room,” says D’Aurora. This feature is something not often seen in assisted living.

In addition, each apartment has a kitchenette and a stackable washer and dryer. While the facility will have laundry services and a new dining room, D’Aurora says that Bethany Village also wanted to give residents the independence to do a small load of laundry on their own or enjoy a quiet breakfast in their pajamas.

“It’s not a dorm situation, it’s in your own apartment,” she adds.

Crescent Crossing will do more than offer comfortable living to residents when it formally opens in in early 2019. It will also be the final piece that connects the many buildings throughout the 100-acre campus. A new indoor walkway will connect the buildings throughout Bethany Village creating a horseshoe shape.

“You can really walk from one end of the campus to the other, from one of the apartment buildings over to the nursing home to visit,” says D’Aurora.

Even with all of these changes, Bethany Village has other construction projects in the works. A new fitness space is being added so that the community can increase its offerings to residents in addition to its current yoga, tai chi and Rock Steady classes.

Bethany Village is also updating one of its dining rooms. Built in the 1970s, much of the building, from its apartments to its common spaces had already been updated.

“We really needed to change the food presentation. A little more of that open kitchen where you can watch things be made and we weren’t really able to do that with the footprint that we had,” she says.

While these renovations and updates are not yet completed, Bethany Village has already received tremendous feedback. As of when this publication went to print, Bethany Village has reserved 60 of the 73 units.

“We’ve gotten great feedback,” says D’Aurora. “We expect we’ll fill those last 13 and then begin a waiting list.” 



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