While high school students are often asked about what they’d like to do as an adult, many of them don’t have information on the types of job available to them. The Troy Ohio Job Fair & Career Day is working to fix that, one student at a time. 

This year’s event will be held Sept. 15 at Hobart Arena. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., all Miami County high schoolers will be able to attend for free to learn about possible careers in the Troy area during the Career Day portion of the day. 

This year, the Troy Development Council is expecting to have students from eight different high schools and career centers, totaling about 1,200 students. 

“We will have 30 employers and 12 colleges and career junior colleges for them to talk to, and we’re going to have some hands-on stuff for the students this year, such as a 3-D printer,” says Ron Musilli, workforce development manager for the Troy Development Council.

In addition, students will have the opportunity to learn about some of these employers, some of which they may not have heard of before.

“We’re going to offer an opportunity for several large employers to have little tented areas where they can get up to 15-16 students at a time and talk about their particular organization and what they’re doing,” says Musilli. “A lot of the larger employers are now beginning to look at bringing in part-time high school students just to get them oriented to the world of manufacturing.”

One employer looking to introduce itself to high school students is Clopay Building Products. The largest manufacturer of residential garage doors in North America, Clopay is located in Troy and is one of its largest employers. 

“I like the interaction with the high schoolers and opening their eyes to what manufacturing is about,” says Bud Holiga, director of human resources for Clopay. “Manufacturing is not the coal mine a lot of people think it is. We’re a clean, high-tech environment.”

From 3 to 7 p.m., job seekers will be able meet employers and hand out resumes at the Job Fair.

“We hope to get somewhere between 700 and 1,000 people to come for the four-hour period of time,” says Musilli. 

During that time, job seekers will be able to discuss job opportunities, give out resumes and even have an interview. Musilli suggests people come dressed appropriately just in case. 

For Holiga, the job fair is the chance for Clopay to further cement itself in the community. 

“Troy is a great community and they have a lot of really good people. We just want to be a part of that,” he says.

“We did the first [job fair and career day] in 2013, … and every year it has gotten larger,” says Musilli. “We keep enhancing it every year and making it a little more impactful.”